Oh Shucks Guyths….

Repost from: Explore Marine Life With The University of Plymouth

What do our undergraduates go on to do after they complete their degrees? Meet Eve Angelina Sanders who left the SW for the bright lights of London to work for the Thames Estuary Partnership earlier this year!

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From September 2015 to June 2018 I studied at University of Plymouth on the BSc Marine Biology and Oceanography degree course. Although I graduated just over five months ago, I am now employed as the ‘Thames Citizen Fish Officer’ working for the Thames Estuary Partnership based at the UCL in London. My job requires me to develop methods for citizen scientists, helping them with things like monitoring fish nursery grounds, safeguarding the natural habitat for plants and invertebrates at different sites around the Thames Estuary and raising awareness of the wildlife in general. I love it!

Studying at the University of Plymouth did so much more than just give me the invaluable skills that I need for my new job. Alongside the engaging lectures, the teaching staff across the whole of the University of Plymouth’s marine biology sector were incredibly supportive and always willing to help where they could. This meant any questions I had (regarding not only the course content but also academia in general) were quickly answered. The practical side of the degree (field trip to a Swedish fjord in Kristineberg and the numerous research vessel trips in Plymouth Sound to study the physical, chemical and ecological aspects of the water) were a lot of fun and gave me the hands-on experience that employers in this field are often eager to see on a CV. Together I feel both of these course aspects (practical experience and the lectures) gave me well-rounded skills and a knowledge base which were crucial to me getting the job I’m in today.

I’m Hooked…

Fab day out with the London Environment Agency – learning how to use a Seine net at Greenwich foreshore. We caught lots (and released them) including bream, flounder, sea bass and more! Just goes to show how well recovered the Thames Estuary is, since it was declared biologically dead only 50 years ago!! It’s now the most biodiverse habitat in Europe. Throwing the facts at you tonight…. You’re welcome… 😉 Naughty…

Squirrel and Chill…

I know … I know…. these guys are bad for the environment and pushed out our native red squirrels, but you have to agree they’re cute!! They’re so friendly in London compared to Devon squirrels – it’s nuts!… (sorry..) Not my most exhilarating post yet, I agree… but hope is in the air for tomorrow’s post! … Trust me on this one… (crowd goes wild..)

Buzz Off…

I know it’s yet another pants title, but please don’t actually buzz off…

London Wildlife Challenge day: absolutely no idea.

Walking home from work the other day (in central London) I passed this climbing creeper plant which has engulfed an entire housing estate courtyard. It was alive and packed with beautiful honey bees! But why? If anyone can identify this mystery, magic plant then do get in touch with me please! I find it astonishing that in central London thousands of honey bees were in one place. Bloody smashing. Just listen to that hum of thousands of little wings…