Plastic Free City London

Next to my job as the Estuary Edges Officer, I also go along to the City of London ‘Plastic Free City’ steering group committee meetings. Plastic Free City is an initiative where businesses, workers and residents based in the City of London can pledge (through Plastic Free City) to become plastic free and zero waste. It’s a fantastic group that has achieved a lot of good things, including installing refillable water stations across the city.

This morning I was up bright and early for a Plastic Free City London networking event at the incredible Rothschild & Co sky lounge. The pictures below are of the view! It was brilliant to see the new Lord Mayor of London, William Russell there.

I heard some truly inspirational talks by Greg Ritt, Group Environment Manager, Rothschild & Co, Grace Rawnsley, Head of Responsible Business, City of London Corporation, Carl Pratt, Founder, FuturePlanetRocks, Mel Fisher, Founderzerowastegoods.com and Alex Furey, Founder, zerowastemindset.com.

As I sat there hearing all these top speeches on how companies, including small start-ups, are waging to go plastic free (great news!), one thing I couldn’t help but notice was the sheer lack of diversity in the room.. But what really got to me was that the need for more diversity in the environmental sector was not mentioned once, not even in the panel Q&A. I found this somewhat disappointing in a room full of amazing people, with successful businesses, driving and promoting zero waste and low waste sustainable business models.

Still, a brilliant morning. It’s really great and to hear the energy behind making the City of London plastic free! Huge congratulations to all the wonderful businesses that turned up and are doing some top quality work on sustainability.

A quote by Mel Fisher this morning which I thought was particularly sad: “There are more pieces of plastic in the ocean than there are stars in the sky..”

Find out more here: https://www.plasticfreecity.london/

Always Check One’s Surroundings…

Having recently returned from Tanzania; I was reminded of a situation I somehow got myself into during my first trip to Tanzania (2008) when I was just eleven. We were on safari in the Serengeti and I was in urgent need to disperse of my urine… Yes, I was in desperate need for a toilet. The nice man driving the Land rover pulled over next to a hippo pool, so I could hop out and scamper behind a bush. Now, going for a wee behind a bush is hard enough when you’re female – let alone trying it in Africa’s wilderness.. Trying to avoid all the African thorns (which for reference are fucking huge!), I went for wee. Half way through this much needed wee, I heard a loud gasp coming from the Land rover which was parked in the near distance. “Girls hurry up!! Quickly, quickly!!” Running back to the truck, still pulling up my trousers, I turned around to realise that I was peeing a few meters away from a rough 4m long crocodile!! Yup.. a flipping 500kg animal that could kill in one smooth, swing of a bite. I’ve since learnt to check my surroundings when peeing in the great outdoors.. You know, just in case there’s a pervert crocodile lurking nearby…

Nurture by Nature: What is Rewilding?

Rewilding. A hot term currently being thrown about a lot. But what does it mean? Read on to get clued up on the ‘hot’ topic of the year. And yes, global warming is very much a part of it.

Rewilding means restoring and encouraging more of, our depleted natural spaces.

Carbon dixoide will have to be removed from the atmosphere for us to avoid the worst impacts of global warming. It is already causing problems on a vast scale; Animal populations have decreased by 60% since 1970 alone! And if that isn’t truly terrifying enough, this statistic suggests that a sixth mass extinction of life on Earth is under way.

Not only do trees and plants provide vital habitat for animals, these clever clogs also suck carbon dioxide from the air as they grow – pretty amazing stuff, aye?

Can you guess where this is going?…

There are two increasingly big existential crises that threaten the world. First is the climate breakdown and second is ecological breakdown. Neither of these frightening occurrences are being dealt with with the urgency needed to prevent our life-support systems from collapsing.

“We are championing a thrilling but neglected approach to averting climate chaos while defending the living world: natural climate solutions. Defending the living world and defending the climate are, in many cases, one and the same.”

A decade of ecosystem restoration was announced at the start of March by the United Nations.

“The degradation of our ecosystems has had a devastating impact on both people and the environment,” said Joyce Msuya, the head of the UN Environment Programme. “Nature is our best bet to tackle climate change and secure the future.”

Recently published research indicates that about a third of the greenhouse gas reductions needed by 2030 can be provided by the restoration of natural habitats (rewilding). Blooming marvelous if you ask me – BUT such positive solutions have only attracted just 2.5% of the funding for tackling emissions. Come on now….. Let nature help us. Let us help nature.

Tooby x

Information source: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/apr/03/let-nature-heal-climate-and-biodiversity-crises-say-campaigners

Call For Help – What Are We Doing to Our Precious Nesting Birds?

Hedges and trees shrouded with netting are a visual representation of how we are increasingly squashing precious nature into a smaller and smaller box and how we are forcing it to fit in with our plans that will have devastating consequences.

Image result for shrouded hedges

I really recommend reading this article:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-47787278

Enough is enough.

Farewell Species #1…. :(

The Morrison government in Australia has formally recognised the extinction of a small island rodent, the Bramble Cay melomys. The first known demise of a mammal because of human-induced climate change. Disgusting news.

It’s not a big, iconic or ‘sexy’ species and therefore it won’t get much coverage in the media. But hold on to your hats, because guys this is seriously important.

The extinction of the Bramble Cay melomys is understood to be the first mammal killed off by human-led climate change.

Image credit: Queensland Government

The limited range of the animal, living on a five-hectare island less than three meters high, left it vulnerable to climate change. However, its 2008 so called “recovery plan”, drawn up when numbers were likely down to just dozens of individuals, downplayed the imminent and eventual risks.

“The likely consequences of climate change, including sea-level rise and increase in the frequency and intensity of tropical storms, are unlikely to have any major impact on the survival of the Bramble Cay melomys in the life of this plan,” the five-year scheme stated.

And we laaaaughed and laughed (OR NOT!!!)…..

The federal policy director for the Wilderness Society, Tim Beshara, said preparation for the plan was limited, and it was never reviewed at its completion in 2013 – but why the hell not?!

“The Bramble Cay melomys was a little brown rat,” Mr Beshara said. “But it was our little brown rat and it was our responsibility to make sure it persisted. And we failed.”

Call me a pessimist, but my gut tells me this will be the first of many species to go extinct due to our undiscriminating behavior. We seriously need to buckle up and push our conservation efforts forward, with a more COLLABORATIVE approach. Easier said then done with little government backing, I’m aware…

 

Information taken from: https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/our-little-brown-rat-first-climate-change-caused-mammal-extinction-20190219-p50yry.html

Spring around the corner jobs!

Winter is a crucial time to take part in wildlife jobs around the garden. These can include simple errands such as ensuring your bird feeders are nicely topped up for your little visitors and cleaning out the ever important bird bath (ensuring to regularly unfreeze it), to placing nest boxes in suitable locations. For the even smaller visitors such as bees, planning your planting to include flowers from February through to November and planting in clumps, can be vital for our important pollinators.

Other, larger jobs, can include setting ponds (even the smallest pond will attract dragonflies, damselflies, frogs, newts and toads!), creating a compost heap, and setting logs down.